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Liguria

Liguria Portofino Italy Italian Riviera

Liguria is a coastal region covering a thin strip of land in northern Italy – bordering with Monaco and France. With Genoa as its main city, this region is famous for its spectacular coast line and resort towns of San Remo and Portofino. Originally a poor fishing village, the picturesque town of Portofino is now regarded as one of the most exclusive and high end coastal destinations in Italy, attracting the Italian and international jet set alike!.

Liguria Highlights

• Rich history
• Traditional cuisine
• Authentic Costal Towns
• Italian Riviera

Liguria History

Governed by the Romans, the region of Liguria became a stronghold of the Roman Empire through the advanced infrastructure and shipping trade, while a time of turmoil and changing leaders was ended by the expansion of the city-state of Genoa in the region. With the growth and dominance of Genoa during the 11th century, the region prospered and became a crossroads for Knights and soldiers making their way to the Middle East to fight in the first crusades. The majority of the ships used to ferry soldiers, equipment, food and livestock belonged to Genoa, allowing the city to slowly but steadily become a maritime superpower in the Mediterranean. As with many cities in Italy, internal squabbles and bickering led to the city’s downfall, with the magnificent city of Genoa soon becoming the property of the Visconti Family of Milan. Fighting for not being denied access to the Mediterranean and the large coastal cities of Liguria, the French and Milanese battled for control of the area for some time. Liguria would not be in the limelight of Italian history for many years to come, until general Giuseppe Garibaldi – the forefather of Italian unity – started his “Expedition of the Thousand” from Genoa. With the boom of the Italian industrialized North, the region of Liguria, with the port of Genoa spearheading the push, became the center of economic growth. Ship yards, steel mills and the various harbors allowed the region to flourish. It was this economic growth that allowed small fishing villages such as Portofino to become seaside resorts, attracting the rich and famous.